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how to play golf card game

Thanks to themany peoplewho have given information on different versions of this game.

Introduction

Golf is a card game for two or more players in which the goal is to score as few points as possible, much as in golf. Each player gets a deck of cards, which are initially face down and may be changed by fresh cards chosen from the stock or discard pile. The goal is to build a layout with as few points as feasible. The final scores are sometimes thought to indicate the number of strokes required to play a hole of golf. It is common to play a series of 9 or sometimes 18 deals or ‘holes’, at the end of which the player with the lowest total score wins.

Although the card game Golf is quite widespread in North America, Britain, and perhaps other English speaking countries, it is seldom found in card game books. Golf is also referred to :Polish PolkaorPolish Poker; the 4-card game is known by some players asTurtle, the 6-card game asHara Kiri, and the 9-card game asCrazy NinesThe golf game mentioned on this website has nothing to do with theSolitaire (Patience)game of the same name.

There are two basic types of the game, which I will refer to as4-card Golfand6-card Golf, based on the amount of cards in each player’s deck. 4-card Golf is sometimes played withpower cardsthat enable a player perform an action such as peeking at a card, swapping a card with another player, and so on. There are also8-card,9-cardand10-cardGolf has several variations, although they seem to be less common.

The way of finishing the game is a significant variation between versions of Golf.

  • The first method, used most often in 4-card Golf, is that if you think you have the lowest score you can use your turn to knock instead of drawing to replace one of your cards. The game ends once each of the other players has taken one more turn.
  • The second method, most often used with the 6-card and larger layouts, is that whenever a layout card is replaced, the new card is placed face up. The game is over when either player’s whole layout is face up.

Four-Card Golf

Players, Cards and Deal

A standard 52-card pack is used, and the number of players could in theory be from two to around eight or more, though the game is said to be best for about four. When there are a lot of people, say eight or more, two packs may be shuffled together. The transaction and play go in a clockwise direction.

Each participant receives four cards, one at a time, from the dealer. The cards of each player must be laid face down in a square. The unsold cards are put face down in the center of the table to create a drawing stock. To begin the discard pile, the top card of the stock is flipped face up and put alongside the stock. Before the game starts, each player may glance at the two closest cards in his or her square arrangement once without displaying them to anybody else. Following this, the layout cards may not be examined again until they are discarded during play or scored at the conclusion of the game.

The Play

The turn to play starts with the player on the dealer’s left, and continues clockwise. At your turn you must either draw the top card of the face-down stock, or draw the top discard, or knock to cause the play to end.

  • If you draw a card, you may use it to replace one of the four cards in your arrangement, but you are not required to do so.notYou are permitted to examine any of your layout cards before picking which to replace. You place the drawn card face-down in your layout, being careful to remember what it is, and discard the card that previously occupied that position, putting it face-up on top of the discard pile. It is then the turn of the following player.
  • If you draw a card from the stock and decide that you do not want to use it in your layout, you may simply discard the drawn card face up on the discard pile, and it is then the next player’s turn. If, on the other hand, you opt to accept the discard,mustUse it to replace one of your layout cards; you cannot just discard it, leaving the scenario unchanged.
  • You do nothing else in your turn if you knock. Each of the other players in order has one more normal turn (in which they draw a card from the stock or discard pile but cannot knock) and then the play ends.

Take note that if you look at any face down card in your arrangement, that card will be highlighted.mustbe discarded and replaced with the card you drew. There is no way to check the value of a face down card and leave it in place.

Scoring

At the conclusion of the game, each player’s four-card square is flipped face up and scored as follows.

  • Each number card is worth its face value (Ace=1, Two=2, and so on).
  • Each Jack or Queen scores 10 points.
  • Each King scores zero points.

After nine deals, the player with the lowest total score wins.

Variations of Four-Card Golf

Looking at cards

Some play that you may choose any two of your cards to look at before play begins – not necessarily the two cards nearest to you. Some games require you to glance at just one of your four cards at the start.

Some games allow you to look at any of your four cards throughout the game at a cost of one point for each time you look at a card, which is added to your score at the conclusion of the hand.

Some games allow you to look at the two cards you saw at the start, or their replacements in your arrangement, as many times as you like throughout the game. Some games require you to have these two cards in your hand at all times so that you (but not the other players) can see them. Some variations include holding all four cards in your hand, which eliminates both the requirement to memorize any cards and the ambiguity regarding your two unseen cards.

Replacing cards

Some rules state that the two cards you didn’t look at to begin with may only be replaced once. The two cards that you see at the start can be replaced as often as you wish.

Turning cards face up; ending the play

This variant is common in golf with six or more cards, although it is also seen in four-card golf. When a card is replaced, the new card is put in the arrangement face up. When all of a player’s cards are face up, the game ends after each of the other players has taken one more turn.

Some play that all four cards begin face down and a card that is face up cannot be replaced. When you replace a face-down card, the new card is put face up. If you draw a card from the deck and discard it, you must flip one of your layout cards face up, and this card cannot be replaced later. As a consequence, with each round, one more card of your arrangement gets revealed. When all players have shown all of their cards, the game is over.

Alternative methods of scoring the cards

Some players believe that if your layout has a pair of equivalent cards (for example, two nines), the score for that pair is zero. If there are three identical cards, only two are cancelled in this manner; if all four cards are identical, the whole arrangement scores zero. Some players believe that couples only score zero if they are in a row or column together; equal cards in diagonally opposing corners do not cancel.

In other versions, queens get 12, 13, or even 20 points instead of 10; in one form, the spade queen receives 40 points while the rest receive 10; in the same variation, eights receive zero points.

Some players believe that one-eyed jacks are wild, since they may be paired with any card, resulting in a pair score of zero.

Some people believe that jacks, like monarchs, have no value. Others play that jacks score zero, queens 12 and kings 13.

Some players believe that jacks are worth 20 points and that when a jack is discarded, the next player loses a turn – the turn to play is passed to the next player.

Some players add two jokers to the deck; a joker has a minus 5 score, therefore the overall score for a layout might be negative.

Special score for the knocker

Some play that a player who knocks but turns out not to have the lowest score is penalised. There are multiple distinct versions of this performed by various groups:

  • The knocker adds a penalty of 10 points.
  • The knocker’s hand score is doubled and 5 points are added.
  • The knocker receives the same score as the highest scoring player for that hand.

If the knocker has the lowest score, some players award the knocker the advantage of a lower score.

  • Some play that the knocker scores zero if lowest.
  • Others believe that the knocker’s score is decreased by the number of players if it is the lowest, and doubled otherwise. For example, in a four-person game, a player knocks with 3 points and gets -1 point (3 – 4) if it is the lowest, but 6 points (2 x 3) otherwise.

Some use a pot to which everyone contributes equally at the start. If the knocker’s score is the lowest, he gets this pot; otherwise, he doubles it. To prevent such payments becoming too large, it may be wise to agree a maximum amount that can be won from or paid to the pot.

End of the game

You may play 18 holes (deals) instead of 9 if you desire a longer game.

Instead of playing a fixed number of holes, you can agree to play until one player’s score reaches or exceeds 100 (or other target agreed in advance). The player with the lowest score is then declared the winner.

Golf with Power Cards

In this group of Four-Card Golf variants, several cards are designated as power cards which can have special effects when drawn from the stock. They go by a variety of names, includingCambioorPabloorCaboorCactusorDaczUsing specifically created cards, at least two proprietary versions have been published:Caboappeared in 2010 andKombioin 2019.

The fundamental rules are the same as they are in four-card golf. Each player starts with four cards face down, either in a row or a square shape, and secretly examines two of them. A turn beings by drawing the top card from the stock or from the discard pile and ends by discarding a card face up on top of the discard pile. Without previously glancing at the card to be changed, the drawn card may be used to replace one in the player’s layout. The goal, as always, is to construct a low scoring configuration.

Some cards are designated as power cards. If one of these is chosen,from the face down stockIt may be played as a regular card or its special ability can be employed, after which it must be discarded. A discarded power card cannot be used as a power card again; if the next player draws it from the discard pile, it can only be played as a regular card. Because various abilities may cause a player’s layout to acquire or lose cards, players may conclude the game with more or less than four face down cards in some editions.

I’ve got descriptions of various variations of this power card variant, and based on the sources, it seems to have originated in Spain or Latin America. The Spanish word cambio means “trade,” which is one of the potential abilities, therefore this might be the variant’s original name. The key variations between the variants are the qualities of the special cards, the point values of the cards, and the manner in which the game is completed.

Ashbir Dhillon explains a basic version of this game that is played in Malaysia using a conventional deck of 52 cards plus two jokers.

  • Ace to ten face value; all graphic cards and jokers are power cards and count ten apiece.
  • Jack: look privately at one of your own cards
  • Queen: examine one of your opponent’s cards in secret.
  • King: without looking at each card, swap one of your cards with one of your opponent’s cards.
  • One opponent must mix his or her cards such that they no longer know which is which.
  • There will be no knocking. The game continues until the stock pile is depleted. The player with the lowest score is the winner.

John Roberts describes a version calledPablo, also played with a 52-card pack plus two jokers. Power cards are sevens and eights.

  • Ace to ten face value, graphic cards (JQK) ten, jokers -5.
  • A draw card may be used to replace two or more equal ranking cards in a player’s layout. If this is successful the equal cards are all discarded and the player’s layout has fewer cards than before. If the cards the player tries to replace turn out not to be equal they remain in the layout along with the card that was supposed to replace them. In that turn, the player does not discard, and the player’s layout now has one extra card than before.
  • A player who draws asevenfrom the stock may perform aswapThe player trades one card from an opponent’s layout for one card from his or her own. The player chooses the opponent’s card, then looks at it privately, then performs the swap without look at the card that is given to the opponent in exchange. The seven is then thrown away.
  • A player who draws aneightmay look privately at any one card – either in the player’s own layout or in an opponent’s layout. The eight is then thrown away.
  • At the conclusion of their turn, a player says ‘Pablo’ to terminate the game. The other players each get one more turn before the layouts are scored. If the player who uttered ‘Pablo’ gets the lowest score, he or she receives a -10 point penalty. If this happens, the Pablo player receives the value of his or her arrangement plus the value of the highest scoring opponent’s layout. In any case, all other players score the same values. If Pablo and another player tie for the lowest score, everyone receives the value of their arrangement.
  • Further deals are performed until a player’s score hits 100 points or higher, at which point the player with the lowest score is declared the winner.

Andrew Soule describes a version called ‘Cumbia‘ played with a 52-card pack without jokers.

  • Card values are as follows: 2 of diamonds -10, red kings -5, black kings 0, queens 12, jacks 11, and other cards face value.
  • Power cards: 4, 5, 6, 7, 10, J. Thesecannot be put in a player’s layout: either the action or the card must be discarded.
  • 4 or 5: The player examines one of their own cards in privacy.
  • 6 or 7: The player examines an opponent’s card in secret.
  • 10: The player exchanges any two cards from any player without looking at them.
  • Jack: The player examines one of their own cards and one of an opponent’s cards, and may exchange them if they so want.
  • Any player may take a card whenever one is discarded.matchingcard fromanyLayout it on top of the trash. The player is not permitted to examine the card beforehand. If it does match and it was taken from an opponent’s layout, the player who discarded it then moves one card, without looking at it, from his or her own layout to the opponent’s layout. As a result, the layout of the victorious player is always lowered by one card. If the second discarded card did not match, the player who moved it replaces the card in the layout it came from and if it was taken from an opponent’s layout receives a 10-point penalty.Note:a red king does not match a black king and thediamond2 does not match another 2: the cardvaluesmust be equal. Note: onlyoneOn top of a usual discard, one additional card may be discarded as a match.
  • To end the play a player calls ‘Cumbia’ at any time during their turn. Each player gets one more turn and then everyone scores the value of their layout. There is no unique reward for having the lowest score in a transaction. After a certain number of deals, say 7, the player with the lowest overall score wins.

Chris Smyth describes a version called ‘Cabo‘ played with a 52-card pack without jokers.

  • Card values: king of diamonds 0, other kings 13, queens 12, jacks 11, 10 down to ace face value. Power cards 7, 8, 9, 10, J, and Q are memorized using the following rhymes:
  • Seven or eight, know your fate: examine one of your own cards and then replace it (only you get to see it)
  • Nine or ten, know a friend: examine one card from someone else and then replace it (only you get to see it)
  • Jack or Queen, switch between: swap the positions of any two cards on the table (excluding draw piles)
  • You may add the drawn card to the layout or use its power, if any, on any round.matchit with a card from the same layout or cards from any layout (s). All monarchs, even diamonds, complement one another. The matched cards are all discarded, followed by the card that started the matching. Without examining at the replacement cards, any matching cards from your opponents’ layouts are replaced with cards from your own arrangement. If you attempt to match a card that turns out not to be equal to the matching card, the card remains in place and as a penalty, for each such failure you draw an extra card from the stock and add it to your layout without looking at it.
  • A player may call ‘Cabo’ at any moment during their turn to finish the game. Each player gets one more turn before scoring the worth of their setup. The game also ends when a player clears all of the cards from their layout or when the draw pile runs out.

Connor Chew recounts a Vancouver, Canada variant called as ‘Cactus‘. It is played with a 52-card pack without jokers and is said to be best for two players, though three or more can play.

  • At the conclusion of the deal, no card is turned face up: the first player must draw from the stock, and their discard begins the discard pile.
  • Card values are as follows: Ace: 1, King: 0, Queen: 10. Jack: 10, other cards face value.
  • Power cards are 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, Jack, Queen.
  • 6, 7, or 8: the player examines one of their own cards in secret.
  • 9, 10, or Jack: the player examines an opponent’s card in secret.
  • The player trades any of their own cards for one of their opponent’s cards without glancing at either.
  • When the Ace, King, 2, 3, 4, and 5 are discarded, no power or distinctive ability is provided.
  • If the preceding player hasn’t utilized the power of the card face up in the discard pile, a player may use their turn to do so. In practice, their turn consists of picking up the card with its power and discarding it again. For example if player A draws a 2 from the deck and exchanges it for a Jack in his layout, then player B can use her turn to apply the power of the discarded Jack to look at one of player A’s cards.
  • A player may discard a card that matches the top card in the discard pile at any time throughout the game, regardless of whose turn it is. The player who discards their card the fastest does not lose a turn. If a player makes a mistake and tries to discard a card that does not match the discard pile, they must return their card and draw two more cards.
  • A round concludes when one player calls ‘Cactus’ at the end of their turn. Their opponents each get one more turn.
  • If you call ‘Cactus,’ and your layout has the lowest point value after everyone has taken their final turn, you get nothing. If any opponent’s point value is equal to or less than yours, you add the value of your layout plus an additional 10 penalty points to your total.
  • If your opponent calls ‘Cactus’ and after your last turn your layout has a higher point value than the caller’s, you add the value of your layout to your score. You get nothing if your point value is equal to or lower than the caller’s.
  • The’winner’ of each round advances to the next round. The player with the lowest value layout wins. The caller’s links are severed. In case of a tie for lowest between two opponents of the caller, they draw cards to decide who will start the next round.
  • There are many rounds of play until a player earns 100 points. The player with the lowest score at this moment wins the game. In a game with more than two players there could be a tie for lowest: in that case further rounds can be played until there is a single winner.

Kamila A. led reports a variation from Poland termed as‘Dacz’, which has no meaning in Polish but might be a phonetic version of the English word ‘Dutch’ or might possibly derived from the Russian word ‘дaча’. In this case:

  • At the start, everyone is given four cards in a row and is allowed to look at two of them.
  • When a Jack is used as a power card, the player may swap any two cards belonging to any other player without looking at them.
  • When a Queen is used as a power card, the player may look discreetly at any one card, either their own or another player’s.
  • Aces are for 1, 2-10 face value, Jacks are worth 11, Queens are worth 12, black Kings are worth 13, and red Kings are worth 0.
  • To end the play a player calls ‘dacz’ (or ‘Dutch’) at the end of their turn, after which everyone else has one more turn and then everyone scores the value of their layout. If the player who shouted ‘dacz’ does not have the lowest value layout, they add 10 points to their score if another person’s layout has a lower value, or they add 5 points if another player ties for lowest. When any player’s total score hits 100 or more points, the game is over, and the person with the fewest points wins.

Six Card Golf

A pair of equal cards in a column scores 0 in this edition. Therefore the main object of the game is to make pairs, while keeping unpaired cards as low as possible.

Players, Cards and Deal

A typical 52-card pack is used by two, three, or four players. With more than four players, a second pack is added, and a third pack if there are more than eight. The transaction and play go in a clockwise direction.

The dealer hands six cards, one at a time, to each player, putting them face down in a rectangle in front of each player as follows:

cardcardcard
cardcardcard

The remaining undealt cards are placed face-down in the centre of the table to form a drawing stock. To begin the discard pile, the top card of the stock is flipped face up and put alongside the stock. Before starting the game, each player flips any two cards in his arrangement face up. The other layout cards may not be looked at until they are discarded or turned up in the course of the play, or scored at the end of the play.

The Play

The turn to play starts with the player on the dealer’s left, and continues clockwise. At the start of your turn, you must either draw the top card from the face-down stock or the top discard. You may use the card you draw to replace any one of the six cards of your layout, but if you choose to replace a face-down card you are not allowed to look at it before deciding to replace it. The new card goes face-up in your layout, while the card that previously held that position goes face-up on top of the discard pile. It is then the turn of the following player.

If you draw a card from the stock, you may determine that it does not go anyplace in your arrangement. In such instance, just place the drawn card face-up on the discard pile, and the following player’s turn begins. It is, however, illegal to draw the top card of the discard pile and discard the same card again, leaving the situation unchanged: if you choose to take the discard, youmustuse it to replace one of your layout cards.

The play ends as soon as the last of a player’s six cards is face up. After that, the hand is scored.

Scoring

At the conclusion of the play, each player’s arrangement of six cards is flipped face-up and scored as follows.

  • Each ace counts 1 point.
  • Each two counts minus two points.
  • Each numeral card from 3 to 10 scores face value.
  • Each Jack or Queen scores 10 points.
  • Each King scores zero points.
  • A pair of equal cards in the same column earns the column no points (even if the equal cards are twos).

After nine deals, the player with the lowest total score wins.

Gary Glover has contributed blank score sheets forup to 8 players,up to 11 playersandup to 12 playersas MS Word files. Dan Wagner has contributed aPDF scoresheetfor up to 8 players.

Variations of Six-Card Golf

Cards

With four, three, or even two players, some players employ two decks. This makes little difference to the game and reduces the chance of running out of cards.

Some players include two jokers each deck. In this case twos are worth 2 points and jokers are -2.

Turning up cards at the start

Some rule that the two cards turned up must be in the same column of the layout; others rule that the two cards turned up must be in the opposite column of the pattern.notThey must be in the same column. Some require one card to be turned up from the central column and one from one of the outer columns.

Some variations allow you to rearrange the cards in your arrangement (without looking at any of the face-down cards) to put your face-up cards in any preferred position after turning up two cards.

Some variations have no cards turned up at the start; instead, each player may glance once at the row of three cards closest to them before replacing them face down.

Turning up cards during the play

Some games allow you to spend your turn to simply flip one of your face-down cards face up.

Some players believe that if you draw a card from the deck and chose to discard it rather than place it in your layout, you will win.mustTurn one of your face-down cards face up, unless you only have one face-down card left, in which case leave it face-down.

Ending the play

Some games allow you to terminate the game by turning all of your remaining face-down cards face up during your turn.

Many players believe that once a player’s last card is shown, each of the other players must take one more turn before the hand is scored.

Scoring

Some players give a negative score, such as -10 points, for four identical cards stacked in two columns (for example two columns each containing two sevens). When using two or more decks, some provide a bigger negative value, such as -20 points for a layout of six identical cards.

Some award
-20 points for four equal cards arranged in a square block. In this variant, if playing with a double deck, a block of 6 equal cards should score minus 40 points since it contains two (overlapping) squares.

Some players believe that a pair of equal cards anywhere on the layout scores zero – they don’t even have to be in the same column.

Some players include two jokers in the deck, which according to different players may be worth -5, -3, -2 or zero points. In this example, the twos are valued +2 points rather than -2. Some people believe that one-eyed jacks are worth nothing.

When two twos (or jokers, if utilized) come in a row together, some players allow them to retain their negative value (-4 for the column if each card is -2). Some award a higher negative value when four such cards are arranged in two columns – for example when playing with two decks, four jokers in two columns count -20.

End of the game

The game, like Four-card Golf, may be extended to 18 holes rather than nine.

Eight Card Golf

This game is very similar toSix-Card Golf, however instead of three columns of two cards, each player’s layout includes four columns of two cards.

A variant employing a double 52-card deck with four jokers was detailed on Bill Whitnack’s defunct Card Games website (108 cards). If there are more than four players, more decks and jokers may be added. The dealer deals eight cards face down to each player, arranged in grid four cards wide and two high, and places the next card face up on the table to start the discard pile, with the remainder of the deck stacked face down next to it to form a drawing stock. The turn to play starts with the player on the dealer’s left, and continues clockwise.

Eachplayer begins his or herfirstTurn by turning one column of two cards face up, as shown in the picture below.

backbackdiamond kingback
backbackclub tenback

The player continues by drawing either the unknown top card of the stock or the face up top card of the discard pile. The player is then presented with three options:

  1. Replace one of the face up cards in the player’s arrangement with the drawn card, then discard the replaced card face up on the discard pile.
  2. Replace one of the face-down cards in the player’s arrangement with the drawn card. The card to be replaced must be chosen without first looking at, and must be discarded face up on the discard pile, even if it is a card the player would have liked to keep.
  3. If the card was drawn from the face-down stock, place it face-up on top of the discard pile and face-up one of the face-down cards in the player’s arrangement.

Everyone will have two or three cards face up after each player has taken one turn. The game proceeds clockwise. Now each turn consists of drawing the top card of the stock pile or the discard pile and using it according to any one of the three options above.

A player whose layout has just one face down card left has an extra option: to draw a card from the stock and discard itwithoutturning over the last card of the layout.

When a player turns the last card of his or her layout face up, each of the other players has one more turn. Then, in all players’ layouts, all remaining face down cards are flipped face up, and the layouts are scored as follows:

Jokers Minus 5 points each
Kings 0 points
Queens, Jacks 10 points each
Aces 1 point each
Numeral cards 2-10 Face value
Pair in a column 0 points
Two equal pairs in any two columns Minus 10 points

It is possible to get a negative total score. Nine deals are played (corresponding to nine holes of a golf course), and the player with the lowest total score is the winner.

Examples of scoring:

club 6club 4diamond kingdiamond 10
club 2heart 4heart acespade 10

The total for the first column is 8 (6+2), the second column is 0 (pair), the third column is 1 (0+1), and the fourth column is 0 (pair).

heart acespade 2club 6club 2
diamond kingheart 2heart 4diamond 2

The first column is 1 (1+0), the second column is 0 (pair), the third column is 10 (6+4), and the fourth column is -10 (pair equal to the pair in column 2), for a total of 1.

Variant

Some games enable a player to flip any two cards face up on their first turn, while others stipulate that once both cards of a column are face up, they cannot be traded.

Nine Card Golf

This game, also known asCrazy Ninesor simplyNines, is a card game played with two or more decks of cards. Each player is dealt nine cards in a three by three square, and turnsthreeTo begin the game, turn the cards face up. The playing mechanism and scoring are essentially the same as inSix-Card Golf, except that a pair of equal cards does not score zero. A column of three equal cards, on the other hand, receives a score of zero.

There are several variants, as with the previous versions.

  • Some play that just two cards are turned face up at the start.
  • Some games include twos scoring +2 rather than -2, and jokers scoring -2 are included.
  • Some play that queens score 12 rather than 10.
  • Some variations include not just a vertical row of three identical cards, but also a horizontal row or a diagonal line of three equal cards.
  • Some players also believe that arranging four identical cards in a square results in a negative score, such as -25.
  • Some rules state that the person with the lowest score for a hole receives a zero, and that if the player who revealed all of their cards first (known as the first exposer) receives a zero.caller) does not have the lowest score, this player adds the lowest scoring player’s score to their own. I don’t know how ties are resolved in this method.

Players must agree on what occurs if two overlapping rows of equal cards or a row intersecting a square block result in a block bonus. Some people overcome this by deleting any line or block of equal cards from the arrangement right away. Play proceeds using just the remaining portion of the arrangement, leaving the spaces where cards were eliminated vacant.

If you choose to keep all nine cards in place, you must agree on how to score arrangements like this:

example (a): intersecting lines

D7S7C7
S3S4H7
D5D3S7

example (b): block overlapping line

C6H9S9
H5S9C9
H5D9C3

Stephen Moraco has described a version of9-card golfIn this game, every pair of equal cards that are horizontally or vertically adjacent earns zero. The same card can be used as part of more than one pair, so equal rows and columns will also score zero since they consist of two pairs.

On hisNines page(backup copy), Jesse Fuchs described a variant in which no cards were shown at the start. Queens are worth zero, kings are worth 10, and jokers are worth -2. When constructed, rows and columns of three equal cards are deleted.

Ten Card Golf

This game requires at least two decks. Each player is dealt ten cards, arranged into five columns of two, and turns any two cards face up. The action is the same as inSix-Card Golf.

Other Golf web pages

A page of inventedGolf Variationssubmitted by readers of this site.

A brief description ofFour-Card Golfappeared on the Real Beer site (archive copy).

Archive copy of Bill Whitnack’s page onEight Card Golf.

Versions of Nine Card Golf byStephen MoracoandJesse Fuchs(archive copy).

Golf Software and Online Games

Iron Sheep Productions, founded by Stephen Moraco, has created a9 Card Golf game for iPhone / iPad.

Joseph McMurray has produced a6-card Golf app for Android.

Glowing Eye has produced aGolf appFeaturing iOS and Android versions that play 4-card and 6-card golf.

Rafikiis an online version of golf that uses Power Cards and can be played in a computer browser.

Gaming Safarioffers a free online 6-card Golf game for Windows.

You can playBill’s 6-Card Golf GameNo download necessary at northwestpages.com.

Golfcan be played online at TrapApps.

Six-card Golf can be played online atTabletopia.

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